1. Moeraki Boulders

Many boulders are scattered on the beaches on the east coast of New Zealand’s South Island, with some round stones reaching 12 feet (about 3.6 meters). They formed on the seabed millions of years ago and were gathered and hardened by sediments and minerals that surround a fossil or shell core. The Moraic Boulders are not the only example of what geologists call “cracks”. They can also visit the round stones in the Hekiunga Bay on the northwest coast of New Zealand’s North Island. Some Moraki boulder is the largest in the world, and scientists are still studying the causes of unique cracks inside the cobble.

  1. Blue Holes

The Belize Blue Hole is located on the lighthouse reef on the edge of the seabed plateau in the Grand Bahama Shoal. The perfect circular hole is surrounded by two coral reefs and is a famous diving spot. On some quiet near ocean surface area, a deep blue circular water area suddenly appears. From the height, it likes the pupil of the sea. From the inexplicable depth, it is deep, mysterious and strange. This hole is called the blue hole. There are many blue holes in different sizes and shapes in the world’s oceans, the most famous of which is the Blue Hole on the 60-mile sea east of Belize City, the capital of Belize, Central America.

The shape of the Belize Blue Hole is an almost perfect circle with a diameter of more than 1,000 foot (305 meters) and a depth of 400 foot (123 meters). Latitude and longitude: 17.185743, 87.320568. After the glaciers melted and the sea level rose, the caves were flooded and became the holy land of many brave divers.

  1. Iceland

The Republic of Iceland, is an island country in the North Atlantic. Located at the intersection of the Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean, one of the five Nordic countries, with a land area of 103,000 square kilometers and a population of about 340,000, this is the country with the smallest population density in Europe. The capital is Reykjavik – the largest city in Iceland. The southwestern region near the capital accounts for two-thirds of the country’s population.  Iceland is a country with many volcanoes and frequent geological activities. The inland is mainly plain landform, with sandy land, cooled lava plains and glaciers. Although Iceland is located on the edge of the Arctic Circle, its climate is suitable.